Category Archives: Field Peas to Foie: Southern Recipes with a French Accent

Cheers! It’s National Cocktail Day!

Have a drink on me!

Enjoy this refreshing Lavender Lemonade-perfect for Saturday sip!

 Lavender Lemonade

A refreshing drink on a hot summer’s day that quenches the thirst with or without the vodka!

Lavender Lemonade
Lavender Lemonade

Makes 2 Lavender Lemonades

Ingredients:

4 ounces Vodka

2 ounces Lavender simple syrup

1 teaspoon fresh Lavender flowers

2 ounces fresh lemon juice

1 cup Crushed Ice

4 ounces Seltzer water or Club Soda

 

Garnish:

2 Slices lemon

 

Directions:

Pour the Vodka and simple syrup into a cocktail shaker; add the lavender flowers and lemon juice.

Muddle until the lavender flowers are broken into small pieces.

Add crushed ice and shake about 10 seconds.

Strain into a chilled martini or glass or tumbler and top with club soda and garnish with a slice of lemon.

 

From Field Peas to Foie Gras: Southern Recipes with a French Accent by Jennifer Hill Booker, © 2014 Jennifer Hill Booker, used by permission of the publisher, Pelican Publishing Company, Inc.

 

Lavender Syrup

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Yields 1 ½ cups

 

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups fresh lavender flowers

1 cup sugar

1 cup water

 

Directions:

In a saucepan bring sugar, water and lavender to a boil, stirring until sugar is dissolved. Simmer syrup, undisturbed, 20 minutes.

Pour syrup through a fine sieve, pressing hard on solids, and cool. Syrup will thicken as it cools.

Syrup keeps, covered and chilled, 2 weeks.

 

From Field Peas to Foie Gras: Southern Recipes with a French Accent by Jennifer Hill Booker, © 2014 Jennifer Hill Booker, used by permission of the publisher, Pelican Publishing Company, Inc.

 

 

 

Fill Your Basket with Scotch Eggs this Easter

Scotch Eggs Chef Jennifer Booker - Credit Deborah Whitlaw Llewellyn
Credit Deborah Whitlaw Llewellyn

Every year, millions of people celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ on Easter Sunday. It also marks the culmination of the Lenten season, and it goes without saying that this is a very important marker for religious believers worldwide. Easter also occurs during a time in the year when our surroundings are in bloom, which falls in line with the Spring season’s ties to birth, growth and fertility.

Somewhere along the line, Easter Sunday picked up secular associations with a big bunny, egg hunts, candy and an array of pastel colors. When it comes to those long-eared hoppers, you can thank German immigrants who shared old stories of an Easter rabbit who laid eggs meant for children to find and baked cakes shaped like hares. In the 1800s, French and German candy makers fashioned chocolate eggs, which spread to various countries across Europe. Kids were encouraged to make little nests shaped like baskets for the Easter Bunny to leave his chocolate eggs. Today, we continue to follow along with these traditions. In light of imposed restrictions and denials common with Lent, indulging in candy is also a welcome treat for adults.

Tradition is a wonderful thing, but it can be exciting to try something new. Tired of dipping your eggs in dye? How about wrapping them in fresh sausage and cooking them to golden brown perfection? Dress up your Easter eggs with this classic–the Scotch egg. Popular in the United Kingdom, Scotch eggs are often served cold in pubs or cafes or packed in picnic baskets. They used to be the perfect lunch for workers whose wives transformed leftovers into a second meal or travelers picking up portable snacks for the road. Stories vary as to who may have created the first Scotch egg, although the London department store, Fortnum & Mason, claims them as their own. 

For a while, Scotch eggs were looked down upon, but lately, they’ve received welcome and deserved recognition. Unlike the basic boiled egg, Scotch eggs combine creamy yolks with seasoned, cooked meat and a crispy exterior. They are a sophisticated blend of textures and flavors. Dip these hot, fried (or baked) eggs into the accompanying tarragon mustard sauce, and you have something very special for Easter Sunday.

 

Spice Up Your Holidays!

Spice up your Holidays!

Try this Simple & Delicious Spiced Wine Recipe.

Chef Jennifer Booker Cookbook

Rich full-bodied wine, fragrant spices and fresh citrus makes this Spiced Wine a real holiday treat!

Spiced Wine

Yields 6 healthy servings

Ingredients:

1 bottle full-bodied red wine

½ cup dark brown sugar

1 orange, zest only

1 lemon, zest only

3 black peppercorns, crushed

2 cardamom pods, crushed

1 cinnamon stick

2 cloves

1/2 cup kirsch

 

Garnish:

12 cinnamon sticks

Directions:

In a large saucepan, combine the red wine with the sugar, the orange and lemon zests, peppercorns, cardamom pods, cinnamon stick and cloves.

Over moderate heat, slowly bring the wine to a very low simmer, stirring to dissolve the sugar.

Remove from the heat, strain out the zest and spices; and stir in the kirsch.

Ladle the spiced wine into heatproof glasses, garnish with cinnamon sticks, and serve hot.

 

Turkey 911: Helpful Tips for the Perfect Thanksgiving Turkey . . EVER!

RoastedTurkey

Here are few tips from chef and author of Southern cookbook, Field Peas to Foie Gras: Southern Recipes with a French Accent, to help make your Thanksgiving turkey your BEST yet!

Prerequisites for Cooking the Perfect Thanksgiving Turkey

 

Number One: The temperature in your oven has to be accurate.
You might want to test your oven before the big day by simply preheating it to 250° and testing it with a cooking thermometer. Start your turkey out uncovered in a 425*F oven for 30 minutes. Cover the breast with aluminum foil and drop the temperature down to 325*F for the remainder of the cooking time. This is guarantees a turkey that is crisp outside and juicy inside.

Number Two: Your turkey has been safely and totally thawed and cleaned. The only safe way to thaw a frozen turkey is to place it in the refrigerator. Other methods such as running cold water over it or placing it in a microwave oven are not safe because of the chance of bacterial growth and food borne illness. So place your frozen bird in the refrigerator at least 2 days before the big day.

 

Number Three: Be sure to remove the neck and giblets from the inside of the turkey! Don’t laugh!  People have done this, so check both the top AND the bottom of your turkey for them. There is nothing quite as anti-climactic is carving the Thanksgiving turkey and having the bag of giblets pop out.
Number Four: Know the actual weight of the turkey. Knowing this number guarantees that you cook your turkey the right amount of time and end up with a turkey that’s golden brown, juicy, and delicious. It also helps plan the timing of your side dishes as well. A good rule of thumb to figure out when to start cooking your Thanksgiving turkey is to back track from the time you want to have it on the table.

 

Number Five: Add your dressing last. Stuff your turkey with dressing once the turkey is totally done and has an internal cooking temperature of 165*F. NEVER stuff a raw turkey-the dressing will absorb the turkey’s uncooked blood and juices and can lead to food borne illness.

 

RoastedTurkey300

Baby It’s Cold Outside! Winter Pumpkin Soup to Warm the Soul!

Chef Jennifer Booker Cookbook

 

Winter Pumpkin Soup with Parmesan Croutons & Bacon Chips

Recipe by Chef Jennifer Hill Booker

Serves 4

Any type of winter pumpkin or squash, such as Sugar Pie pumpkin or butternut squash, can be used for this soup. Just remove the seeds, cut it into wedges, drizzle with olive oil, and roast in a 350° F oven. The roasting softens the vegetable and reinforces its natural sweetness. The addition of stock and cream gives the soup a velvety smoothness, and the croutons and bacon chips add a nice crunch.

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons olive oil

6 slices of Hickory smoked bacon, cut into 1-inch strips

2 sprigs fresh rosemary

1 tablespoon unsalted butter

1⁄2 medium white onion, diced

1 clove garlic, minced

2 cups roasted pumpkin, mashed, or unsweetened pumpkin puree

2 1⁄2 cups chicken stock

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

1⁄2 cup heavy cream

2 cups stale bread, cut into 1-inch cubes

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

1⁄4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

1⁄4 teaspoon red chili flakes

Freshly ground black pepper

Directions:

In a large stockpot over medium heat, add 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Add the bacon and cook for 5 to 6 minutes, then add the rosemary and cook an additional 4 to 5 minutes, or until the bacon is golden and crispy and the rosemary leaves are lightly browned.

Drain the bacon and rosemary on a paper towel. Remove the rosemary leaves from the stems and roughly chop the leaves, discarding the stems. Set the rosemary aside. Discard all but 1 tablespoon bacon grease from the stockpot. Set the bacon chips aside while you make the pumpkin soup.

Add the butter, onion, and garlic to the bacon grease in the stockpot and cook over medium-low heat for 15 minutes, or until the onion is translucent. Stir often to loosen any browned bits from the bottom of the pan. Add the mashed pumpkin and the chicken stock, and season lightly with salt and pepper.

Bring to a simmer, reduce the heat to low, and cook 15 to 20 minutes. Stir in the heavy cream just before you serve; do not let the soup boil once the cream has been added.

Preheat the oven to 400° F.

To make the parmesan croutons, toss the bread, olive oil, cheese, chili flakes, and black pepper together in a large bowl. Spread the bread mixture onto a sheet pan and bake 5 to 6 minutes, or until the bread cubes are golden brown.
Serve the soup in warm bowls topped with croutons, bacon chips, and the chopped rosemary.

Layout 1

 Field Peas to Foie Gras: Southern Recipes with a French Accent by Jennifer Hill Booker, © 2014

Jennifer Hill Booker, used by permission of the publisher, Pelican Publishing Company, Inc.

Forget Viagra! Eat a Beet

Chef Jennifer Booker Cookbook

Now that I have your attention . . . here are 6 Great Health Benefits of Eating Beets!

1. Beets are nature’s Viagra
Seriously. One of the first known uses of beets was by the ancient Romans, who used them medicinally as an aphrodisiac. And that’s not just urban legend – science backs it up. Beets contain high amounts of boron, which is directly related to the production of human sex hormones.

2. Beets are high in many vitamins and minerals
Potassium, magnesium, fiber, phosphorus, iron; vitamins A, B & C; beta-carotene, beta-cyanine; folic acid. These are but a few of the many nutrients, vitamins and minerals that can be found in beets and beet greens. Beets are particularly beneficial to women whom are pregnant, as the vitamin B and iron are very beneficial to new growth cells during pregnancy and replenishing iron in the woman’s body.

3. Beets cleanse the body
They are a wonderful tonic for the liver, works as a purifier for the blood, and can prevent various forms of cancer. Nuff said, right? Tastes good and prevents cancer? Sign me up!

4. Beets help your mental health
Beets contain betaine, the same substance that is used in certain treatments of depression. It also contains trytophan, which relaxes the mind and creates a sense of well-being, similar to chocolate. Beets can also lower your blood pressure. So if you’re already steamed about not eating beets, you can get a two-fer by diving into them right away.

5. Beets are used as a stomach acid tester
How in the world does that work? Glad you asked. If you are eating a lot of beets or beet juice, and your pee turns pink, guess what? You have low stomach acid. Pee still clear? Ratchet it up and get juicing (use the greens too)! Nutritionists use beets and beet juice to test stomach acid levels, so stay ahead of the curve by adding beets to your diet now.

6. Beets are a high source of energy
At the same time they are low in calories and high in sugar (although the sugar is released into your system gradually, as opposed to chocolate). Very few foods found in the natural world are as beneficial as beets in this regard.

Beets are a wonderful addition to any dietary need. With their high volume of nutrients, delicious taste, and multitude of uses, anyone can jump right into beets without missing a beat.

Looking for a Delicious Beet Recipe? Pick up a copy of Field Peas to Foie Gras: Southern Recipes with a French Accent, at YourResidentGourmet.net

article from fullcircle.com

photo credit Deborah Whitlaw Llewllyn

Join Chef Jennifer @ Strippaggio Book Signing!

Layout 1Chef Jennifer Booker heashot

~Book Signing~

Join Chef Jennifer Booker as she signs her debut cookbook:
Field Peas to Foie Gras: Southern Recipes with a French Accent

Thursday, January 29th, 2015 6pm

Strippaggio – Artisan Oils, Vinegars, Specialty Food & Gifts

855 Emory Point Dr, Suite C-135, Atlanta, Georgia 30329
Strippaggio

Are You ready for a Delicious New year?

Ring in the New Year with this Southern Inspired cookbook, Field Peas to Foie Gras: Southern Recipes with a French Accent,  by author, Jennifer Hill Booker, and enjoy recipes like Black Eyed Pea Salad-just in time for

2015!
Happy New Year to You and Yours!
Chef Jennifer

 

 

Ring in the New Year with 
Black Eyed Pea Salad-a French Twist on on Southern Favorite!

Black Eyed Pea Salad

Yields 6 servings

Ingredients:

4 cups black eyed peas, cooked and chilled

¼ cup yellow onion, chopped
¼ cup green bell pepper, chopped

¼ cup red bell pepper, chopped

Vinaigrette:

1 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon fresh thyme, chopped

1 tablespoon honey

½ teaspoon red pepper flakes

1 teaspoon Sea salt

1 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper

½ cup apple cider vinegar
1 ½ cup extra virgin olive oil

Directions:

Combine the garlic, thyme, honey, red pepper flakes, salt, black pepper and vinegar in a large bowl.

Slowly whisk in the olive oil. Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper.

Add the black eyed peas, onion, red bell pepper, and green bell pepper.

Stir to coat with the vinaigrette.

Chill the Black Eyed Pea Salad for at least 4 hours.

Enjoy!

 


About our author:

 Chef Jennifer Hill Booker

 

Building a culinary foundation on her Mississippi roots and a farm-to-table concept, Chef Jennifer Hill Booker creates a unique take on contemporary Southern cooking. Combining agrarian approaches and down-home style with classical-French techniques, Booker reinvents Southern cuisine. These 135 recipes are the culmination of summers and holidays spent in Charleston, Mississippi, at the family farm. 

  

 

 

Available at Barnes & Nobles, A Capella Bookstore, and YourResidentGourmet.com

Order your copy Chef Jennifer’s cookbook,Field Peas to Foie Gras: Southern Recipes with a French Accent 
at YourResidentGourmet.com

 

Follow Chef Jennifer on Facebook 
Chef Jennifer Booker
and Twitter
@Chefjennbooker