Hard Rock Café Announces Its Culinary Series!

Hard Rock Café Announces Its Culinary Series!

 

 Hard Rock Cafe hosts Celebrity Chef, Jennifer Hill Booker, for an Exclusive Culinary Event in the Velvet Underground.  

 

 

Wednesday, December 12, 2012 – 6:00 – 8:30 PM

Hard Rock Cafe’s Velvet Underground 

215 Peachtree Street NE

Atlanta, GA  30303

 

 

Chef Jennifer Booker is teaming up with Hard Rock Café to feature a Culinary Cooking Series……just in time for the holidays!

 

Live cooking demonstration prepared on site by Chef Jennifer, featuring the following Winter inspired menu:

 

Winter Pumpkin Soup with Parmesan Croutons and Hickory Smoked Bacon Chips
Braised Short Ribs with Root Vegetable Mash and Sautéed Garlic and Kale
Apple Spice Cake

 

  • Attendees will have the opportunity to sample the menu items
  • All attendees to receive a recipe card with Chef Jennifer’s featured menu items
  • Donated canned goods will benefit the Atlanta Community Food Bank
  • Signature Pomegranate Martinis will be available for purchase
  • Enjoy Hard Rock Café’s legendary Rock Music

 

Tickets are $20 or $10 + 5 canned goods donation

To purchase tickets for this event, go to: http://www.ticketalternative.com/Events/21401.aspx

 

For more information on Chef Jennifer Hill Booker, log onto: http://www.yourresidentgourmet.net/

or

http://www.facebook.com/chefjenniferbooker

The Art of Pastry and History on Buche de Noels

The Art of Pastry www.stephanetreand.com

MOF Pastry Chef Stephane Treand

Holiday Classes Dec 1 8am-1pm

Dec 10-12 8a – 4pm

 

 

Bûche de Noël (French pronunciation: [byʃ də nɔɛl]Yule log“) is a traditional dessert served near Christmas in France and several other francophone countries and former French colonies. It can be considered a type of sweet roulade.

The traditional bûche is made from a Génoise or other sponge cake, generally baked in a large, shallow Swiss roll pan, frosted, rolled to form a cylinder, and frosted again on the outside. The most common combination is a basic yellow sponge cake, frosted and filled with chocolate buttercream; however, many variations on the traditional recipe exist, possibly including chocolate cakes, ganache and espresso or otherwise-flavored frostings and fillings.

Bûches are often served with a portion of one end of the cake cut off and set on top of the cake or protruding from its side to resemble a chopped off branch, and bark-like texture is often produced in the buttercream for further realism. This is often done by dragging a fork through the icing. These cakes are often decorated with powdered sugar to resemble snow, tree branches, fresh berries, and mushrooms made of meringue.

The name Bûche de Noël originally refers to the Yule log itself, and was transferred to the dessert only after this custom had fallen out of use, presumably during the first half of the 20th century. It is attested in 1945 as referring to the cake. The cake recipe itself is older, and known to date to the 19th century.

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/meringue-mushrooms/detail.aspx – link for listeners to use for the meringue mushrooms

 

Thank you!!

Chef Sandra J Mallut

The Culinary Butler

Phone: 323-636-3236

Email: theculinarybutler2012@gmail.com

www.theculinarybutler.net

 

Hard Rock hosts Celebrity Chef, Jennifer Booker, for an Exclusive Culinary Event

 

Hard Rock’s Culinary Demo Session

Wednesday, December 12, 2012 – 6:00 PM
Hard Rock Cafe’s Velvet Underground

215 Peachtree Street NE

Atlanta, GA  30303

Hard Rock hosts Celebrity Chef, Jennifer Booker, for an Exclusive Culinary Event in the Velvet Underground.  Live cooking demonstration on site featuring the following menu items:

Winter Pumpkin Soup with Parmesan Croutons and Hickory Smoked Bacon Chips
Braised Short Ribs with Root Vegetable Mash and Sautéed Garlic and Kale
Apple Spice Cake

Attendees will have the opportunity to sample the menu items and receive a recipe card to prepare the items at home.  A Pomegranate martini will be the featured beverage available for purchase.   Donated canned goods from the event will benefit the Atlanta Community Food Bank.

For more information on Chef Jennifer Booker, go to: http://www.yourresidentgourmet.com/ or http://www.facebook.com/chefjenniferbooker

Surviving Thanksgiving Leftovers!

Greetings!

Everyone says that leftovers are the best part of Thanksgiving.  While you could make just enough food to feed your friends and family on the big day, you’d miss out on one of the best parts of Thanksgiving: leftovers. Many cooks actually plan to have food left over so they can send it home with guests—or keep it for themselves to enjoy several satisfying post-holiday meals. So what do you do with pounds of leftover turkey, a pile of meaty bones, cranberry sauce destined to hang around for months, pans of stuffing, and cold mashed potatoes? Your Resident Gourmet Newsletter is to share two great recipes destined to give you a helping hand in turning those leftovers into delicious meals that will get you into next week.

There are two basic approaches to leftovers. The first is simple: Store and then reheat everything. The other option is to turn your extras into new dishes, including soups, pot pies, and casseroles. With General Guidelines for Leftovers, these recipes and a little creativity, you can transform leftovers into a completely different feast.

 

Happy Thanksgiving!

Chef Jennifer

General Guidelines for Leftovers:

No doubt you’ve already had your turkey-stuffing-potatoes-cranberry-sauce sandwich, the official meal of post-Thanksgiving Dinner snack. Even though the perishables may have been in the refrigerator before you settled into an afternoon of football games and coupon clipping, they’re still vulnerable to bacteria, so here is a quick reference on food safety.

 

  • First, it’s a good idea to make sure your refrigerator is at or below 40 degrees Fahrenheit and the freezer is 0 degrees or colder. These temperatures can be checked with an inexpensive refrigerator thermometer. A warmer environment gives bacteria a more hospitable environment to grow, so keep them cold.
  • Cooked poultry can stay refrigerated for three to four days and frozen for four months. After that, it should be thrown away.
  • If you cooked ham instead of turkey, sliced leftovers can stay in the fridge for three to four days and in the freezer for one to two months.
  • A cheese platter is a nice appetizer or perfect finish to your Thanksgiving feast, and leftover cheeses can be saved. Soft cheeses are OK in the fridge for a week, hard cheeses, like sharp cheddar, are fine for three to four weeks if they’re open.
  • When reheating leftovers, Food Safety Guidelines recommends using a meat thermometer to make sure foods are reheated to an internal temperature of at least 165 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • That goes for reheating food in the microwave too. If yours doesn’t have a turntable that helps ensure even heating, give the container of food a 180-degree turn halfway through the heating time, to make sure everything gets hot. Wait one minute before testing it with the thermometer.
  • The most commonly identified food-borne illnesses are caused by the bacteria trifecta of Campylobacter, Salmonella and E. coli, and by a group of viruses best known as Norwalk-like Viruses. Symptoms of eating foods with these organisms are pretty much the same: diarrhea, abdominal cramps, nausea and sometimes fever and vomiting. So be smart about eating your leftovers and don’t let things linger too long, no matter how tempting they may be.
  • Store each dish in its own container to avoid cross-contamination.
  • Divide food between small, shallow containers so that it cools down quickly.
  • When freezing, use heavy-duty foil and freezer-appropriate containers and bags; wrap items tightly and in a double layer to maintain moisture and prevent freezer burn.
  • Store leftovers promptly: The USDA recommends discarding any leftovers that have been at room temperature more than two hours. Do not let leftovers ‘cool off’ before putting them in the refrigerator.

Potato Cakes with Fried Eggs and Turkey-Red Pepper Hash

Recipe Courtesy Wes Martin

 www.foodnetwork.com

Fuel up your houseguests for some serious holiday shopping with this hearty breakfast recipe. The potato cakes can be flavored with just about any herbs left in the fridge; leftover turkey and gravy can be transformed into this delicious hash by adding those last few spoonfuls of corn, peas, or even chopped Brussels sprouts.

Yields 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 1 cup leftover mashed potatoes, at room temperature
  • 1 large egg, plus 4 for frying
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 1/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon finely chopped sage
  • Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 5 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 small onion, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 small red bell pepper, stemmed, seeded, and chopped
  • 8 ounces diced leftover turkey meat, about 2 cups
  • 1/2 cup leftover turkey gravy
  • 1/4 cup leftover cooked corn kernels
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh parsley

Directions

Preheat the oven to 200 degrees F.

In a bowl, mix the potatoes, egg, and milk together until combined. Add the flour, season with salt and pepper, and mix until smooth. Heat 2 teaspoons oil on a non-stick griddle over medium heat; pour about 1/3 cup of the batter onto the warm griddle, gently spread it to a circle about 4″ wide, and cook, flipping once, until golden brown, 3-4 minutes per side. Transfer to the oven to keep warm. Repeat with remaining batter.

Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a small skillet over medium low heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the red pepper and cook until softened, about 4 minutes more. Add the turkey, gravy, and corn and cook, stirring, until turkey is heated through. Season hash with salt and pepper, stir in the parsley, and keep warm over low heat.

Heat the remaining teaspoon of oil on the griddle over medium-high heat. Crack the eggs onto the griddle and cook until desired doneness. To serve, put a warm potato cake on each of 4 plates; top the cakes with a fried egg and divide the hash evenly among them.

Leftover Thanksgiving Panini

Recipe Courtesy of Williams-Sonoma Kitchen

www.Williams-Sonoma.com

A sandwich made with leftovers from the Thanksgiving dinner is traditional, but a panini can be every bit as memorable as the big feast. Enjoy crisp, golden toast filled with tender slices of turkey, provolone cheese and stuffing, balanced with a touch of piquant cranberry relish and creamy gravy.

Yields 4 servings

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup turkey gravy base
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 8 slices sweet batard, each cut on the bias about 1/2 inch thick
  • Olive oil for brushing
  • 1/2 cup cranberry relish
  • 4 slices provolone cheese
  • 12 oz. thinly sliced roast turkey breast meat
  • 1 1/3 cups leftover cooked stuffing

Directions:

In a small saucepan over medium-high heat, combine the turkey gravy base and milk. Bring to a simmer, whisking occasionally, then reduce the heat to low. Cover and keep warm.

Brush one side of each bread slice with olive oil. Lay the slices, oiled side down, on a clean work surface. Spread 1 Tbs. cranberry relish on each slice. Place 1 cheese slice on each of 4 bread slices. Top with the turkey and stuffing, dividing evenly. Cover each with one of the remaining bread slices, oiled side up.

Preheat an electric panini press on the “panini” setting. Preheat an oven to 200°F.

Place 2 sandwiches on the panini press, close the lid and cook until the bread is golden brown and crisp and the cheese is melted, about 4 minutes. Place on a rack-lined baking sheet and keep warm in the oven. Repeat with the remaining 2 sandwiches. Carefully open the sandwiches and spoon on the warm gravy. Close the sandwiches, cut in half and serve immediately.

Fifty Shades of Grey!

Fifty Shades of Grey!

Looking for some ‘stimulating’ conversation . . . . . . . . . . . . Join Basil MAGAZINE Radio Show host, Chef Jennifer Booker, and the ladies of The Writer’s Coffee Shop Publishing House, who are responsible for bringing us Fifty Shades of Grey!


At this point, you’ll be hard pressed to find anyone who hasn’t heard of Fifty Shades of Grey, the unassuming ‘mommy porn’ title that took the world by storm earlier this year when it hit #1 on the New York Times Bestseller List. But what leaves many an industry professional scratching their head is how Fifty Shades of Grey came to be such a phenomenon in the first place.

The Writer’s Coffee Shop Publishing House has done what is largely considered by industry as ‘the impossible.’ Specializing in e-books, this little-publisher-that-could brought E.L. James’ explosive debut to market – and can be held single-handedly responsible for giving the book world the biggest story it’s seen in years. The Writer’s Coffee Shop Publishing House is headed up by CEO and Sydney native Amanda Hayward, with fellow Australian Cindy Bidwell in charge of social media relations, with a base in Texas led by Christa Beebe, Jenny Pedroza and Jennifer McGuire. Bringing an honest respect for writers and their audiences and a diverse collection of titles to the marketplace, they credit their inclusive approach and knack for finding ‘diamonds in the rough’ to the wild success their titles have seen thus far.

Tune in Mondays at 6pm EST
www.blogtalkradio.com/basilmagazineradio

Prerequisites for Cooking the Perfect Thanksgiving Turkey

Greetings!

 

Last year I stood in front of the meat counter contemplating buying an organic turkey for Thanksgiving. I must have stood there 15 minutes looking at the price per pound sticker wondering was it really worth the money? I mean, come on, during November the price of a 20 pound non-organic turkey is CHEAP. Of course you’re also paying for all of the added sodium, antibiotics, and hormones-not to mention the horrible conditions in which they are raised in. So I but the bullet, and bought an organic free-range turkey.

 

Let me tell you-it was the moistest, most flavorful turkey I have ever cooked or eaten. No matter what type of turkey you decide to cook for Thanksgiving dinner this year, there are a couple of prerequisites for Cooking the Perfect Thanksgiving Turkey and a quick and easy Turkey Rub and Turkey Brine recipes.

 

Happy Thanksgiving!

Chef Jennifer

 

Prerequisites for Cooking the Perfect Thanksgiving Turkey

 

 

 

Number One: The temperature in your oven has to be accurate.
You might want to test your oven before the big day by simply preheating it to 250° and testing it with a cooking thermometer. Start your turkey out uncovered in a 425*F oven for 30 minutes. Cover the breast with aluminum foil and drop the temperature down to 325*F for the remainder of the cooking time. This is guarantees a turkey that is crisp outside and juicy inside.

 

Number Two: Your turkey has been safely and totally thawed and cleaned. The only safe way to thaw a frozen turkey is to place it in the refrigerator. Other methods such as running cold water over it or placing it in a microwave oven are not safe because of the chance of bacterial growth and food borne illness. So place your frozen bird in the refrigerator at least 2 days before the big day.

 

Number Three: Be sure to remove the neck and giblets from the inside of the turkey! Don’t laugh!  People have done this, so check both the top AND the bottom of your turkey for them. There is nothing quite as anti-climactic is carving the Thanksgiving turkey and having the bag of giblets pop out.
Number Four: Know the actual weight of the turkey. Knowing this number guarantees that you cook your turkey the right amount of time and end up with a turkey that’s golden brown, juicy, and delicious. It also helps plan the timing of your side dishes as well. A good rule of thumb to figure out when to start cooking your Thanksgiving turkey is to back track from the time you want to have it on the table.

 

Number Five: Add your dressing last. Stuff your turkey with dressing once the turkey is totally done and has an internal cooking temperature of 165*F. NEVER stuff a raw turkey-the dressing will absorb the turkey’s uncooked blood and juices and can lead to food borne illness.

 

 

Turkey Rub

Yields ½ cup Turkey Rub

 

Ingredients:

2 teaspoons sage, crumbled

1 teaspoon leaf thyme, crumbled

½ teaspoon marjoram

1 teaspoon black pepper

3 tablespoons sea salt
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 ½ teaspoon basil
1 teaspoon paprika

 

Directions:

  • Combine all ingredients.
  • Rub liberally over the entire turkey, as well as in the cavity and under the skin of the breast, before roasting.
  • Roast the turkey on lowest level of the oven at 425*F for 30 minutes. Insert a probe thermometer into thickest part of the thigh and reduce the oven temperature to 350*F.
  • Bake the turkey to an internal temperature of 165*F.  A 14 to 16 pound bird should require a total of 2 to 2 1/2 hours of roasting.
  • Remove from the oven and let the turkey rest, loosely covered with foil for 15-30 minutes before carving.

 

 

 

Turkey Brine

Yields 2 gallons of Turkey Brine

 

Ingredients:

1 cup kosher salt

1/2 cup light brown sugar

1 gallon vegetable stock

1 tablespoon black peppercorns

1 1/2 teaspoons allspice berries

1 1/2 teaspoons chopped candied ginger

1 gallon heavily iced water

 

Directions:

  • Combine the salt, brown sugar, vegetable stock, peppercorns, allspice berries, and candied ginger in a large stockpot over medium-high heat.
  • Stir occasionally to dissolve solids and bring to a boil. Then remove the brine from the heat, cool to room temperature.
  • Combine the brine, water and ice in the 5-gallon bucket. Place the thawed breast side down in brine. If necessary, weigh down the bird to ensure it is fully immersed, cover, and refrigerate or set in cool area (like an insulated cooler) for 8 to 16 hours, turning the bird once half way through brining.
  • Remove the bird from brine and rinse inside and out with cold water. Discard the brine.
  • Place the bird on roasting rack inside a half sheet pan and pat dry with paper towels.
  • Roast the turkey on lowest level of the oven at 425*F for 30 minutes. Insert a probe thermometer into thickest part of the thigh and reduce the oven temperature to 350*F.
  • Bake the turkey to an internal temperature of 165*F.  A 14 to 16 pound bird should require a total of 2 to 2 1/2 hours of roasting.
  • Remove from the oven and let the turkey rest, loosely covered with foil for 15-30 minutes before carving.

 

 

5 Time Saving Tips for a Stress Free Thanksgiving

Greetings!

It’s that time of year again! The leaves are changing, the days are getting shorter, and fall is in the air. It’s also the time of year where the stresses of the holidays are looming ahead, especially the stresses of preparing that perfect Thanksgiving meal. But do not despair; Your Resident Gourmet Newsletter is to the rescue! Here are 5 Time Saving Tips for a Stress Free Thanksgiving. These tips are guaranteed to help you stress less, save money, and enjoy your Thanksgiving more!

Happy Thanksgiving!

Chef Jennifer

 


5 Time Saving Tips for a Stress Free Thanksgiving

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Plan Your Thanksgiving Menu Early

Are you serving turkey, chicken, or goose? Will there be wine or your special holiday punch? Now is the time to plan your Thanksgiving menu; from soup to nuts. Once you’ve planned your menu you can pull out your recipes and check your cabinets to see what you have in stock and what you’ll need to buy. Write out your shopping list, listing everything you need, and you won’t have to worry about those last minute trips to the store spoiling Thanksgiving Day.

 

2. Shop Now

Now that you have your grocery list in hand it’s time to head to the grocery store. Buy your non-perishables now and save yourself time later, not to mention you will be able to take advantage of the pre-holiday sales, avoid the long lines and the lack of parking spots. When I shop I keep like items together in my shopping cart so that they are together during checkout and get bagged together as well. Once you get your groceries home, leave them bagged and simply set them aside until you’re ready for them. All you have left to buy are your perishable items and can purchase them as much as a week out.

 

3. Cook Now, Relax Later

Decide on the dishes that can be cooked ahead of time and either stored in the refrigerator or frozen until right before Thanksgiving. For example, can you make the cornbread for your cornbread stuffing now and freeze it until you’re ready for it? What about the cranberry relish, collard greens, and sweet potato pies? Cook and store as many of the items on your menu as possible and defrost them the day before Thanksgiving. This tip will definitely save you time and make cooking your holiday meal more relaxed.

 

4. Get Organized

Now that you have your menu planned, your recipes pulled, have shopped for your non-perishables items, and even precooked some of your dishes; it’s time to decide on your table decor. Go ahead and pull your favorite holiday tablecloth, place mats, and napkins. Make sure that they don’t have any holes or stains and have them laundered and ironed. If you’re using your ‘special occasion’ dishes, flatware, and stemware go ahead and get them out of storage, counted, and wiped down. Doing this now will guarantee you the table of your dreams without the usual holiday stress.

 

5. Ask For Help

Thanksgiving Day is finally here and it’s time to enlist some help with the finishing touches. Ask someone to set the table. Since the linen is ironed and the dishes counted, this should be an easy task. Someone else can pour the drinks or plate the salads. If you’ve invited guests to share your meal, don’t be shy about asking them to bring a dish to share as well. It’s always nice to have an extra appetizer or dessert or a nice bottle of wine.

 

You’ve done it! Planned the perfect menu, set a beautiful table, and cooked your Thanksgiving meal to perfection. Now it’s time to enjoy the fruits of your labor-all without the usual stresses associated with the holidays.

 

 

 

 

CANstruction ATL

About Canstruction®


Canstruction is the most unique food charity in the world!

Canstruction, Inc. is a registered 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that holds annual design and build competitions to construct fantastic, giant sized, structures made entirely out of canned food. In each city after the structures are built and the winners declared the creations go on view to the general public as giant art exhibits. At the close of the competitions all of the food used in the structures is donated to the local food banks for distribution to community emergency feeding programs.

Our Vision
Wherever a Canstruction competition is held thousands of hungry people are fed, a greater awareness of the issues surrounding hunger is brought home to the public, and a spotlight is placed on the design and construction industry giving back to the communities it helps build.

Our Mission
To engage, amaze and inspire the community to work together raising canned food to feed hundreds of thousands of hungry people.

Who Benefits?
Men, women and children seeking food assistance through community feeding programs. Canstruction raised over 2 million pounds of food in 2010 which was donated to local food banks, enough food to provide 1.5 million meals.

Who Donates Food?
Architects, engineers, designers, contractors, students, and the local community come together to raise canned food to donate to local food banks each year.

It’s Cold Outside . . .

It’s cold outside!
Here’s a delicious Spiced Cider recipe to warm you up!

~Spiced Cider~
recipe by Chef Jennifer Hill Booker

Yields 4 servings

Ingredients:
1 quart apple cider
1-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled
1 fresh lemon, cut in quarters
1 fresh orange, cut in quarters
2 cinnamon stick
pinch of allspice
2 whole cloves

Garnish:
4 whole star anise

Directions:
Combine all ingredients in a stainless steel saucepan.
Place over medium heat and bring to a boil.
Reduce heat and simmer on low for 15 minutes.
Strain mixture and serve hot in mugs.
Garnish with star anise.

Photo: It's cold outside!
Here's a delicious Spiced Cider recipe to warm you up!

               ~Spiced Cider~
recipe  by Chef Jennifer Hill Booker 

Yields 4 servings

Ingredients:
1 quart apple cider
1-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled
1 fresh lemon, cut in quarters
1 fresh orange, cut in quarters
2 cinnamon stick
pinch of allspice 
2 whole cloves

Garnish:
4 whole star anise

Directions:
Combine all ingredients in a stainless steel saucepan. 
Place over medium heat and bring to a boil. 
Reduce heat and simmer on low for 15 minutes.
Strain mixture and serve hot in mugs. 
Garnish with star anise.